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State Questions 790 and 792

In this final installment of the November 2016 ballot measures, we are covering state question 790, a measure regarding public money and religious freedom, and state question 792, a measure regarding the sale of wine and beer in Oklahoma. 

State Question 790 is a constitutional amendment that was put on the ballot by a majority vote of the Oklahoma Legislature.  If approved, the legislatively referred constitutional amendment would appeal Section 5 of Article 2 of the Oklahoma Constitution, which prohibits public money from being spent for religious purposes, commonly referred to as a Blaine Amendment.

A vote ?yes? is a vote in favor of allowing public money to be spent for religious purposes.

A vote ?no? is a vote against allowing public money to be spent for religious purposes.

Supporters of SQ790 believe that the repeal would remove an obstacle to the state allowing religious institutions to participate in public programs on an equal b...

Jennifer Engleman | Nov 3, 2016
State Questions 777 and 779

We're continuing our series on the state questions that will appear on the ballot November 8. This week we're looking at State Question 777, referred to as Right to Farm, and State Question 779, a measure that would increase Oklahoma's sales tax by one percent to fund education. 

State Question 777, commonly referred to as Right to Farm, is a legislatively referred constitutional amendment sent to a vote of the people by the Oklahoma Legislature. If passed, it will add Section 38 to Article II of the Oklahoma Constitution, which creates state constitutional rights. The addition would guarantee protection to farmers and ranchers utilizing agricultural technology, livestock procedures and ranching practices.

Passage of SQ 777 would effectively prevent the legislature from passing laws regulating agriculture and livestock practices. Any law attempting to regulate or restrict the agricultural industry would result in a lawsuit and, in the absence of compellin...

Jennifer Engleman | Oct 31, 2016